She Cuts Up Her Buffalo

sara haase art @ gmail . com

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maxcapacity:

Here’s the print-on-demand zines I’ve got for sale (left to right, top to bottom)

APEZILLA DOUBLE DIGEST - 5.5x8.5” B+W 84 pages

APEZILLA 3 - 6x9” B+W 42 pages

PLANET OF THE APEZX - 8.5x11” B+W 32 pages

Pixel Smut 1 - 6x9” B+W 20 pages

Crystal Structures - 6x9” Full-color 32 pages

This Guy - 6x9” Full-color 10 pages

TV ONE - 6x9” Full-color 32 pages

TV2 - 6x9” Full-color 40 pages

You can also get free PDF versions of most of them. And there’s usually some coupons over here: http://www.lulu.com/promos/current-specials

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While forgery is very clearly an economic crime, it may not always be an artistic or aesthetic one. Forgers can even be an art lover’s friend. Sometimes, they give us works that great artists simply didn’t get around to making. If a fake is good enough to fool experts, then it’s good enough to give the rest of us pleasure, even insight.
Blake Gopnik, “In Praise of Art Forgeries” (via austinkleon)

(via austinkleon)

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austinkleon:

blakegopnik:

Daily Pic, Met Monday Edition: This is that rare thing – a Pic I haven’t seen in the flesh, because I couldn’t, because this “Rembrandt” has been declared an 18th-century British fake…
…for a forgery to deceive at all, it has to preserve a great many features of a genuine object. So, in evidentiary terms, it may be best to think of a fake as being quite like a later, slightly corrupted edition of an ancient text whose earliest manuscripts no longer exist (which is the case with the vast majority of very old writings)  or even as a blurred photocopy of a lost document. If someone launched a new kind of fake-bomb that destroyed every original Rembrandt, the surviving forgeries would still give us a strong link to the art he made, and to the moment of its making. Maybe we need to stop thinking, as the market does, of works as either by a given artist or not. We may want to think in terms of a complex Venn diagram which maps a series of works as being more or less closely linked to a given moment of important art making – a diagram that would register Rembrandtism, rather than Rembrandt himself. And could it even be that a work by a follower, or even by a much later forger, gets closer to the core of the concept than a lame piece by the master himself?

Emphasis mine. Filed under: forgery

austinkleon:

blakegopnik:

Daily Pic, Met Monday Edition: This is that rare thing – a Pic I haven’t seen in the flesh, because I couldn’t, because this “Rembrandt” has been declared an 18th-century British fake…

…for a forgery to deceive at all, it has to preserve a great many features of a genuine object. So, in evidentiary terms, it may be best to think of a fake as being quite like a later, slightly corrupted edition of an ancient text whose earliest manuscripts no longer exist (which is the case with the vast majority of very old writings)  or even as a blurred photocopy of a lost document. If someone launched a new kind of fake-bomb that destroyed every original Rembrandt, the surviving forgeries would still give us a strong link to the art he made, and to the moment of its making. Maybe we need to stop thinking, as the market does, of works as either by a given artist or not. We may want to think in terms of a complex Venn diagram which maps a series of works as being more or less closely linked to a given moment of important art making – a diagram that would register Rembrandtism, rather than Rembrandt himself. And could it even be that a work by a follower, or even by a much later forger, gets closer to the core of the concept than a lame piece by the master himself?

Emphasis mine. Filed under: forgery

12 notes

Bill Murrrraaaayyyy $50 for the original watercolor/ink painting :) please email SaraHaaseArt@gmail.com

Bill Murrrraaaayyyy $50 for the original watercolor/ink painting :) please email SaraHaaseArt@gmail.com